The June 2021 Jumpstart Info Session is Available for Viewing

Thinking about taking RLMI’s 15-Day Whole-Food Plant-Based Jumpstart? Want to lose weight, lower your cholesterol, reverse diabetes, increase your energy, improve your sleep and/or reduce your medications?  Watch the Jumpstart Info Session, recorded June 23, 2021.

Dr. Ted Barnett and a team of RLMI facilitators leads a discussion on what the Jumpstart is, why it works, and how to participate. Several recent Jumpstart participants share their stories, favorite cookbooks, and medical results from their Jumpstart experience.

RLMI’s evidence-based medically supervised small group Jumpstart program is available globally and provides the information and support you need to achieve positive health results and reduce or reverse chronic conditions.

Watch the Jumpstart Info Session below.

Want to learn more? Visit our Calendar of Events here.

New RLMI paper on Jumpstart published in the AJLM

“Jumpstarting Health with a 15-Day Whole-Food Plant-Based Program” was published in the American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine on April 8, 2021 by Dr. Susan Friedman, MD, MPH, Dr. Ted Barnett, MD, FACLM, Carol Hee Barnett, PhD, JD., Robert Franki, MA, Bruce Pollock, MBA and Beth Garver Beha, MS, CAS.

Abstract:

The 15-Day Jumpstart was developed as an evidence-based, affordable, standardized, replicable and scalable program, designed to demonstrate quickly to patients that changing what they eat can improve their health.  The program was designed using the principles of the Self-Determination Theory of motivation and personality.  Patients were instructed to eat an Esselstyn-compliant, whole-food plant-based (WFPB) diet consisting of vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and legumes.  Of the 389 participants in the program from September 2018 – February 2020, average weight loss was 5.8 pounds (7.3 for those whose BMI was > 30), average systolic blood pressure drop was 6.8 points (16.8 points for those with systolic blood pressure > 140), average drop in cholesterol was 26 points (44 points for those with a cholesterol > 200), average drop in LDL was 19 points (33 points for those with an LDL > 100), and average drop in fasting blood sugar was 5.1 points (28.4 points for those starting in the diabetic range); p-value was <0.005 for fasting blood sugar and < 0.001 for all other comparisons.  A 15-day program that helps patients adopt an Esselstyn-style WFPB diet, through education, individualized medical feedback, social support, and facilitated small group work, rapidly improves health.

This paper can be viewed here.

Easy to Make Veggie Burgers

These veggie bean burgers, adapted from Chocolate Covered Katie, are the bomb. The ingredients are inexpensive. They are very easy to make, healthy (low or no fat), and very filling! You can use any type of bean (recommended beans are soybeans, pinto beans, black beans), any type of flour ((recommended flours are oat, whole wheat) and herbs, spice, and seasonings to suit your palate. If you’re an improv cook, this is a simple recipe to adapt. And if you’re not, just follow the directions in the link from Chocolate Covered Katie.

Adapted from original recipe: https://chocolatecoveredkatie.com/veggie-burger-recipe-best/ 

INGREDIENTS:

15 oz dried Soybeans (cooked and softened)

3 Tbs Tomato Paste

¼ Tsp Salt

¼ Tsp Onion Powder

1 Tsp Garlic Powder

2 Tbs Oat Flour

½ Cup Cooked Diced Vegetables- (I used carrots, peas, and green beans)

I added ½ Tsp Paprika, ½ Tsp Cumin, and a ½ Tsp Curry Powder

STEPS:

  1. To make the veggie burgers, drain the beans, and mash either by hand, with an immersion blender, or in a food processor, depending on desired burger texture.
  2. Stir in all other ingredients, and form patties. (Add more flour if too soft to form patties.)
  3. Either pan fry–flipping halfway through cooking–or place on a parchment-lined pan.
  4. Bake at 350 F for 10 minutes. Flip, then bake an additional 10 minutes or until desired texture is reached.
  5. Leftovers can be refrigerated. – (I baked them.)

Mixed Sweet Potatoes and/or Yams

This is the perfect Passover or Easter dinner dish. It’s easy to make, affordable, filling and healthy. I used a mix of orange sweet potatoes (3#) and Murasaki sweet potatoes (3#).

Murasaki sweet potatoes are fairly new to the market. They are grown primarily in California, and originally developed by the Louisiana State University’s Sweet Potato Research Station. They were released to growers in 2008. Their name comes from the Japanese word for purple, which is the color of their skin. The inner flesh is yellowy white. They have a flavor redolent of sweet and nutty, and are broad-spectrum resistant to disease. They are an excellent source of vitamin A, and a good source of dietary fiber, potassium, and vitamin C. They also contain calcium, protein, iron, and amino acids.

I purchase Murasaki sweet potatoes at Trader Joes’s in a 3# bag for $3.99. Murasaki are my absolute favorite potatoes, because they are so versatile.

INGREDIENTS

6# total – regular sweet potatoes and Murasaki sweet potatoes or a mix. Yams work too.

STEPS

  1. Wash potatoes. Scrub any dirt off, if necessary.
  2. Peel the bad parts off of the potatoes and discard.
  3. Line a large baking/cookie sheet with either a silicone mat or parchment paper.
  4. Place potatoes on cooking sheet with mat or parchment paper. Pierce each sweet potato a few times with a fork (to prevent bursting).
  5. Bake at 425 for 40 minutes on the center rack in the oven.

Test with a fork to verify they are fully cooked. They will be soft in the middle.

Mix of Sweet and Murasaki Potatoes BakedMix of Sweet and Murasaki Potatoes

March is National Nutrition Month

National Nutrition Month® is an annual campaign created by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, the primary trade association for dietitians (licensed by states as RDN’s or Registered Dietitian Nutritionists). During the month of March, “everyone is invited to learn about making informed food choices and developing healthful eating and physical activity habits.” https://www.eatright.org/food/resources/national-nutrition-month

The Academy encourages you to “personalize your plate.” Three of the four elements of this initiative are things anyone on a whole-food plant-based diet could benefit from: Cook & Prep, Meal Planning, and Vary your Diet. (The 4th, “Visit an RDN,” is only needed in certain circumstances, and in this context is sort of like having your barber recommend a haircut.)

The website includes a handout on “Vegging Out: Tips on Switching to a Meatless Diet”: https://www.eatright.org/food/nutrition/vegetarian-and-special-diets/vegging-out-tips-on-switching-to-a-meatless-diet. It contains good tips on switching to plant-based, including the following:

“A good first step is to review your current diet. Make a list of foods that you regularly eat, paying special attention to vegetarian foods that you like. Next, aim to incorporate these foods — along with a variety of whole grains, fruits, vegetables and beans — into your eating plan. A good way to include vegetables, for example, is to add them to the foods you already enjoy, such as pasta or rice dishes.”  AND

“Plan meals around whole grains, vegetables, fruits and beans. This ensures a variety and balance of nutrients, including fiber, protein and health-promoting phytochemicals. … Use fresh and dried herbs and spices for extra flavor. Mustard, vinegar, hot sauce, hummus and fresh salsa are flavorful condiments.” AND

“It is a myth that vegetarians can’t get enough protein in their diets. Vegetarians easily can meet their protein needs when they eat a variety of plant proteins and get enough calories. Plant proteins can provide all the essential amino acids that your body needs. Whole grains, beans, lentils and nuts are good sources of protein. Eating a variety of different plant proteins each day helps your body store and use protein.” [Remember, these are licensed dietitians talking.]

Please leave aside the Academy’s advice on using oils (they say some are healthier than others). Rochester Lifestyle Medicine recommends that you eliminate oils from your diet on any whole-food plant-based diet. There is no need for oil; it adds empty calories (lots of them), can cause inflammation, and predisposes you to insulin resistance and risk of type 2 diabetes.

Finally, this is great advice from the handout:

“Pick up a vegetarian cookbook or search the internet for vegetarian recipes and meal ideas, and explore vegetarian foods from various global cuisines. While American cuisine can be meat-focused, it’s easy to find ample vegetarian options on many Asian, Indian and Middle Eastern menus. The supermarket is a good place to find vegetarian ingredients and ready-to-eat meatless foods from around the world.” Just keep out the oil, and exclude high-fat plant foods if you are on Rochester Lifestyle Medicine Institute’s Jumpstart: https://rochesterlifestylemedicine.org/about-jumpstart/

Nutrition Month

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