WFPB Cooking Demos: RAVS Chefs in the Kitchen

A whole-food plant-based diet is linked to better health, weight loss, lower cholesterol and blood pressure, reversal of Type 2 diabetes, improved sleep and energy.

Expand your plant-based cooking repertoire and learn how to make some simple, delectable and crowd pleasing plant based recipes. Join seasoned and inventive chefs, Sandy Baker, Renee Bell, and Peg Haust-Arliss in their kitchens, while they generously share their knowledge, skills and enthusiasm for plant-based cooking!

Watch the plant-based cooking demo presentation below featuring Renee Bell’s Oatmeal Berry Casserole, Sandy Baker’s Strawberry-Banana Breakfast Wrap, Peg Haust-Arliss’s Chick’n Salad (soy curls),  Renee Bell’s Yam and Kale Soup, Sandy Baker’s Chocolate Mousse.

Want to learn more? Visit our Calendar of Events here.

 

Easy to Make Veggie Burgers

These veggie bean burgers, adapted from Chocolate Covered Katie, are the bomb. The ingredients are inexpensive. They are very easy to make, healthy (low or no fat), and very filling! You can use any type of bean (recommended beans are soybeans, pinto beans, black beans), any type of flour ((recommended flours are oat, whole wheat) and herbs, spice, and seasonings to suit your palate. If you’re an improv cook, this is a simple recipe to adapt. And if you’re not, just follow the directions in the link from Chocolate Covered Katie.

Adapted from original recipe: https://chocolatecoveredkatie.com/veggie-burger-recipe-best/ 

INGREDIENTS:

15 oz dried Soybeans (cooked and softened)

3 Tbs Tomato Paste

¼ Tsp Salt

¼ Tsp Onion Powder

1 Tsp Garlic Powder

2 Tbs Oat Flour

½ Cup Cooked Diced Vegetables- (I used carrots, peas, and green beans)

I added ½ Tsp Paprika, ½ Tsp Cumin, and a ½ Tsp Curry Powder

STEPS:

  1. To make the veggie burgers, drain the beans, and mash either by hand, with an immersion blender, or in a food processor, depending on desired burger texture.
  2. Stir in all other ingredients, and form patties. (Add more flour if too soft to form patties.)
  3. Either pan fry–flipping halfway through cooking–or place on a parchment-lined pan.
  4. Bake at 350 F for 10 minutes. Flip, then bake an additional 10 minutes or until desired texture is reached.
  5. Leftovers can be refrigerated. – (I baked them.)

Mixed Sweet Potatoes and/or Yams

This is the perfect Passover or Easter dinner dish. It’s easy to make, affordable, filling and healthy. I used a mix of orange sweet potatoes (3#) and Murasaki sweet potatoes (3#).

Murasaki sweet potatoes are fairly new to the market. They are grown primarily in California, and originally developed by the Louisiana State University’s Sweet Potato Research Station. They were released to growers in 2008. Their name comes from the Japanese word for purple, which is the color of their skin. The inner flesh is yellowy white. They have a flavor redolent of sweet and nutty, and are broad-spectrum resistant to disease. They are an excellent source of vitamin A, and a good source of dietary fiber, potassium, and vitamin C. They also contain calcium, protein, iron, and amino acids.

I purchase Murasaki sweet potatoes at Trader Joes’s in a 3# bag for $3.99. Murasaki are my absolute favorite potatoes, because they are so versatile.

INGREDIENTS

6# total – regular sweet potatoes and Murasaki sweet potatoes or a mix. Yams work too.

STEPS

  1. Wash potatoes. Scrub any dirt off, if necessary.
  2. Peel the bad parts off of the potatoes and discard.
  3. Line a large baking/cookie sheet with either a silicone mat or parchment paper.
  4. Place potatoes on cooking sheet with mat or parchment paper. Pierce each sweet potato a few times with a fork (to prevent bursting).
  5. Bake at 425 for 40 minutes on the center rack in the oven.

Test with a fork to verify they are fully cooked. They will be soft in the middle.

Mix of Sweet and Murasaki Potatoes BakedMix of Sweet and Murasaki Potatoes

March is National Nutrition Month

National Nutrition Month® is an annual campaign created by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, the primary trade association for dietitians (licensed by states as RDN’s or Registered Dietitian Nutritionists). During the month of March, “everyone is invited to learn about making informed food choices and developing healthful eating and physical activity habits.” https://www.eatright.org/food/resources/national-nutrition-month

The Academy encourages you to “personalize your plate.” Three of the four elements of this initiative are things anyone on a whole-food plant-based diet could benefit from: Cook & Prep, Meal Planning, and Vary your Diet. (The 4th, “Visit an RDN,” is only needed in certain circumstances, and in this context is sort of like having your barber recommend a haircut.)

The website includes a handout on “Vegging Out: Tips on Switching to a Meatless Diet”: https://www.eatright.org/food/nutrition/vegetarian-and-special-diets/vegging-out-tips-on-switching-to-a-meatless-diet. It contains good tips on switching to plant-based, including the following:

“A good first step is to review your current diet. Make a list of foods that you regularly eat, paying special attention to vegetarian foods that you like. Next, aim to incorporate these foods — along with a variety of whole grains, fruits, vegetables and beans — into your eating plan. A good way to include vegetables, for example, is to add them to the foods you already enjoy, such as pasta or rice dishes.”  AND

“Plan meals around whole grains, vegetables, fruits and beans. This ensures a variety and balance of nutrients, including fiber, protein and health-promoting phytochemicals. … Use fresh and dried herbs and spices for extra flavor. Mustard, vinegar, hot sauce, hummus and fresh salsa are flavorful condiments.” AND

“It is a myth that vegetarians can’t get enough protein in their diets. Vegetarians easily can meet their protein needs when they eat a variety of plant proteins and get enough calories. Plant proteins can provide all the essential amino acids that your body needs. Whole grains, beans, lentils and nuts are good sources of protein. Eating a variety of different plant proteins each day helps your body store and use protein.” [Remember, these are licensed dietitians talking.]

Please leave aside the Academy’s advice on using oils (they say some are healthier than others). Rochester Lifestyle Medicine recommends that you eliminate oils from your diet on any whole-food plant-based diet. There is no need for oil; it adds empty calories (lots of them), can cause inflammation, and predisposes you to insulin resistance and risk of type 2 diabetes.

Finally, this is great advice from the handout:

“Pick up a vegetarian cookbook or search the internet for vegetarian recipes and meal ideas, and explore vegetarian foods from various global cuisines. While American cuisine can be meat-focused, it’s easy to find ample vegetarian options on many Asian, Indian and Middle Eastern menus. The supermarket is a good place to find vegetarian ingredients and ready-to-eat meatless foods from around the world.” Just keep out the oil, and exclude high-fat plant foods if you are on Rochester Lifestyle Medicine Institute’s Jumpstart: https://rochesterlifestylemedicine.org/about-jumpstart/

Nutrition Month

St Pat’s Day Green Smoothie

Looking for a healthy, easy to make smoothie with just a few simple ingredients?

This is the perfect St. Pat’s Day smoothie. It’s the perfect way to boost nutrients, cell function and immunity, and slow down the aging process, which we know speeds up by consuming toxins and processed foods.

Now, you have options here. You can make this into a Relish Bowl, by limiting the water you add and the blending time.

Note: If you have a Vitamix or high speed blender, you can add all of the ingredients without chopping. If you have a low powered blender, you should chop the greens, soften frozen fruit and dates (by soaking in hot water for 10 minutes prior to blending).

Servings: 2

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 cups leafy Field greens (arugula, kale, spinach, etc)
  • 1 cup Mixed fruit – fresh or frozen
  • Banana (for thicker, richer texture)
  • A splash of lemon juice (optional)
  • 1/4 cup of water.
  • 1 Tbs Flax Seeds (optional)
  • 1-2 dates (optional for a sweeter taste, chunkier texture)

STEPS

  1. Grind the flax seeds in an electric spice/coffee grinder or blender until they turn into flour. You can also use store-bought ground flax seeds but make sure the flax meal is fresh. (if using)
  2. Put all ingredients in a blender and blend on low until desired consistency (relish bowl or smoothie).
  3. Spoon into glasses or bowls for immediate consumption.